Inside Track #19 with David Condon & Jason Kennedy – LISTEN NOW!

First broadcast June 1st, Inside Track #19 is now available for listening in the Mixcloud player below. This show had some technical problems that we apologize for. It also featured a reference to the David Cronenberg movie, Scanners.

Michael Ironside

On this show we discussed Salman Abedi and his links with a Libyan terrorist group, the LIFG (Libyan Islamic Fighting Group). Firstly, we discounted the oft-cited cry after such attacks, that the Muslim community didn’t do enough to alert the authorities of an attacker’s intentions. In fact, the authorities were warned on SIX occasions, five warnings were from members of the public, while the sixth was from the FBI, in January of this year. Tom Clark, of Another Angry Voice has come up with a list of 13 questions that would be worth hearing answers to regarding this attack… many of the questions centre on why Abedi and others like him were able to pass so easily through UK airports on their way to Libya (Abedi also spent time in Syria). Middle East Eye reports that MI5 gave their blessing to UK Libyans going out to fight in the coup against Gaddafi. The Guardian reports that Abedi acted, ‘largely alone‘, which is misleading, given the decades-long context of the Libyan extremist community he had grown up in the UK, and the fact that MI5 knew all about these individuals for many years. The Burning Blogger of Bedlam has a long post about this history, and has even written a free book about the Libyan coup of 2011. Lastly, any lessons to be learned are unlikely to include punitive measures against any of the spooks involved, as, in true British fashion, inquiries into any potential wrongdoing by MI5 will be carried out by… MI5.

Inside Track #18 with David Condon & Jason Kennedy – LISTEN NOW!

First broadcast May 25th, Inside Track #18 is now available for listening in the Mixcloud player below. This show was chiefly reaction to the Manchester terror attack and included a clip from the movie, V for Vendetta.

Who will prevail?

Something of a blame game has raged since the terror attack on Manchester. Katie Hopkins tweeted that a ‘final solution’ was now required, and, despite her attempts to wriggle free, this has now ended her career at LBC. The Sun went for something from left-field, with a Corbyn smear that may see Manchester become the second city to show them the door. The Intercept chose a different path, choosing to jab an accusatory finger at Tony Blair, who was warned by the intelligence services that the 2003 invasion of Iraq would increase, not decrease, the risk of terror attacks on the UK. For those seeking a set of ideas to blame, rather than an individual or a billion muslims, the World Socialist Web Site saw the Manchester attack as being, ‘a by-product of the endless series of imperialist wars waged since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 and escalated since the 2003 invasion of Iraq.’ Over at Counterpunch, John Wight highlighted the indisputable hypocrisy of continued Western support for Saudi Arabia, the primary worldwide sponsor of Islamic terrorism. And if all that reading is too much for you, Metro helpfully provided a guide to ‘updating your Facebook profile with the Manchester heart‘.

In the parallel universe that is The Guardian, their latest astonishing scoop continued the paper’s downward trajectory since the Snowden leaks, as they splashed repeatedly on a leaked copy of… Facebook’s… moderation policies. Stay tuned, as next week they reveal the shocking truth about the password recovery system of Friends Reunited.